Traditional Burmese Clothing

Burmese Traditional Clothing

You are loosely tied around the waist and have three pockets and fabric buttons from China. Every country has its own traditional dress, which represents its cultural and social status. In Burmese culture, Kaye Lin girls are scrutinized, and a girl should dress modestly because she is an image of her family. At home or at ceremonies all over the world, she wears traditional clothes from Myanmar and looks elegant and graceful. "The Burmese really care about their own ethnic and traditional clothes," she says in the shop, about the buzzing of sewing machines.

CLOTHING AND FASHION IN MYANMAR: LONGYIS, EINGYIS, LOTUSROBS AND ETHNIC CLOTHING

Burmese costumes consist of a sarong-like rock named longgyi (pronounced LONG-ees). You are loosely bound around the waistline and have three Chinese bags and fabric knobs. Traditional dancing costumes consist of a tight-fitting longgyi that extends from the waistline to the coff. Burmese costly pairs of shoes exhibited in a local heritage centre are decorated with golden straws and have mythic bird wings over their ontoes.

Myanmar has a wide range of fabrics and some of the most loved ones are Acheik, Silkware and Lotusrobe. Then, the ancient Thuddawartha Brahmas took all five of them to the place where "Ariyas" saints were living and gave them the fragrant lotus cloaks. Since only four bathrobes have been available so far, a bathrobe is still missing.

This is said to have been the source of the gown of the lotus. Some lotuses are made out of threads of the lotsus plants and are presented to Buddha images and, in particular cases, to important Buddhist friars who have received honours for excellent worship work.

Lotuses are often adorned with floral designs in golden and silvery foils to make them as gorgeous as possible, to offer Buddha pictures in shrines as well as outfits. In his Pyo or 60 Ghahtas of Sayadaw Shin Ohn Nyo, one of the four "shins" or revered clergymen in Myanmar's literary works, wrote that a series of Thingan Pareikaya was presented to Prince Sidhattha, the Buddha to come, by Yatikaya, Lord of Brahmas' residence, the forth from the Lotus blossom, which was in the care of the old brahma.

The Myanmar Buddhists are celebrating a symbol of the sacred garment of the Buddha in accordance with this myth in which Thudawatha Brahma sacrificed the Buddha's garments from the crude batch. Aygathi ("outer garment") must be two and a half metres long and Thinbine ("underwear") six metres long.

In order to obtain a flawless loto garment, the loom must weav ten metres. Approximately 220,000 lotuses are needed for a kit of gowns and 60 looms take 10 working day to finish a kit. From the stalks to the final garment, the whole procedure lasts one months. Being a hydrophyt, lotuses are continually sprinkled with pure running spray while they are weaved and compressed between the rolls to achieve a higher densities.

This weaved gown's colour is naturally iridescent, but it is coloured in a colour commonly referred to as the dark jack-fruit colour, reminiscent of old-golden. Though the length, height and colour correspond to the usual garment, it is not so difficult, but lightweight, powerful and much more attractive.

The scent of lotuses can be smelled from a newly interwoven lozenge. These lotuses can give a cool feel in the hottest time of the year and a warm feel in the coldest. Ht Tamein is one of the traditional clothes of Burmese woman. During the Konbaung Dynasty (1752-1855), these skirts or lower part of the torso were wore as wraparound skirts, sometimes also as pleated garments, which were placed "tightly over the belly slightly in the middle of the waist".

The Burmese men, by contrast, were wearing the traditional undergarment known as the sock. Then, the ancient Thuddawartha Brahmas took all five of them to the place where "Ariyas" saints were living and gave them the fragrant Lotus cloaks. Since only four bathrobes have been available so far, a bathrobe is still missing.

This is said to have been the source of the gown of the lotus. Some lotuses are made out of threads of the lotsus plants and are presented to Buddha images and, in particular cases, to important Buddhist friars who have received honours for excellent worship work.

Lotuses are often adorned with floral designs in golden and silvery foils to make them as gorgeous as possible, to offer Buddha pictures in shrines as well as outfits. In his Pyo or 60 Ghahtas of Sayadaw Shin Ohn Nyo, one of the four "shins" or revered clergymen in Myanmar's literary works, wrote that a series of Thingan Pareikaya was presented to Prince Sidhattha, the Buddha to come, by Yatikaya, Lord of Brahmas' residence, the forth from the lotus blossom, which was in the care of the old brahma.

The Myanmar Buddhists are celebrating a symbol of the sacred garment of the Buddha in accordance with this myth in which Thudawatha Brahma sacrificed the Buddha's garments from the crude batch. Aygathi ("outer garment") must be two and a half metres long and Thinbine ("underwear") six metres long.

In order to obtain a flawless loto garment, the loom must weav ten metres. Approximately 220,000 lotuses are needed for a kit of gowns and 60 looms take 10 working day to finish a kit. From the stalks to the final garment, the whole procedure lasts one months. Being a hydrophyt, lotuses are continually sprinkled with pure running spray while they are weaved between the rolls and compressed to achieve a higher densities.

This weaved gown's colour is naturally iridescent, but it is coloured in a colour commonly referred to as the dark jack-fruit colour, reminiscent of old-golden. Though the length, height and colour correspond to the usual garment, it is not so difficult, but lightweight, powerful and much more attractive.

The scent of lotuses can be smelled from a newly interwoven lozenge. These lotuses can give a cool feel in the hottest time of the year and a warm feel in the coldest.

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