Totnes

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The charming Devonian town of Totnes has a busy main street and a regular market. At Totnes there are regular open-air markets on Friday and Saturday. s_span class="mw-headline" id="History">History[edit] The Totnes ( or) is a commercial and community centre located at the mouth of the River Dart in Devon, England within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. There is a long tradition in Totnes, going back to 907, when his first stronghold was made. Already in the 12th and 17th century it was an important trading community and its former richness and importance can be seen in the number of merchants' homes constructed in the 16th and 17th century.

Totnes is the name of this city. According to Historia, Aurelius Ambrosius and his frther Uther Pendragon ended up in Totnes to regain the British crown from the Uzbek Vortigern. Totnes (first mentioned in 979 A.D.) derives its name from the Old English person name Totta and neess or tongue of land.

Until 1523 Totnes was the second wealthiest city in Devon after a taxation and the 16th wealthiest in England, before Worcester, Gloucester and Lincoln. In 1553, King Edward VI issued Totnes with a deed permitting a former Benedictine priorory house, established in 1088, to serve as the Totnes Guild House and Board.

The city hall was rebuilt into a district courthouse in 1624. Until 1887 the city hall was also used as a municipal jail with additional jail cell. Totnes became the first transitional city of the transitional action in 2006. The permaculture artist Rob Hopkins and his pupils, and later Naresh Giangrande, came up with this transitional design in his hometown of Totnes, which can be found in many permaculture stories and movies.

Situated on a hillside on the western banks of the Dart stream, the city divides Totnes from the Bridgetown area. Some 1.6 kilometres above the city, the stream is still driven by tides until it reaches Totnes Weir, constructed in the seventeenth cenury.

A38 runs about 11 kilometres from Totnes and is linked to the city by the A384 from Buckfastleigh and the A385 to Paignton. It is also on the A381 between Newton Abt and Salcombe. The Totnes train depot is located on the Exeter-Plymouth line and has train services directly to London Paddington, Plymouth and Penzance and as far as Aberdeen.

The Totnes (Riverside) train terminal is near by at the south end of the South Devon Ferryway Trust, which operates touristic steamships along the River Dart to Buckfastleigh. As the Dart to Totnes river is open to sea-going vessels, the mouth was used until 1995 for the imports and exports of goods from the city[34] and there are still frequent cruises along the mouth to Dartmouth.

The Dartington Hall Estate, which comprises Schumacher College and until July 2010 Dartington College of Arts, is located on the west outskirts of the city. Commemorative tablet that commemorates the Seán O'Casey residency in Totnes. Among the remarkable Totnes are: Babbage had a close familial relationship with the city and came back to visit King Edward VI Gymnasium for some time before leaving for Cambridge.

Writer Desmond Bagley was living in Totnes from 1966 to 1976. And Sophie Dix, actor, born in Totnes. The historian iste James Anthony Froude, auteur de l'Histoire d'Angleterre De la chute du Wolsey à la défaite de l'Armada espagnole, à Totnes geboren. TV scriptwriter and writer David Gilman is living in Totnes.

of the Transitionovement. The popular vocalist and song writer Ben Howard was educated and lived in Totnes. Cosmo Jarvis, singer-songwriter and film-maker, grew up in Totnes. Jock and Dom Reardon lived and worked in Totnes. Benjamin Kennicott, the Jewish scientist, was also a native of Totnes. The linguist Edward Lye, who authored the first Anglo-Saxon lexicon, was a native of Totnes.

The Admiral Sir Frederick Michell KCB (1788-1873) was killed in Totnes. Former violoncellist of the Electric Light Orchestra from 1972-1975, Mike Edwards spent the later years of his career living in Totnes until his demise in 2010. Meanwhile Joseph Mount, a metronomy recording artist, spent some time in Totnes.

The playwright Seán O'Casey was living in the city from 1938 to 1954. At the end of the seventeenth hundred John Prince was pastor of Totnes, who was the writer of The Worthies of Devon, an important manuscript. St. John Oliver St. John defended the city in both the short and long-parliament. The novelist Mary Wesley, writer of The Camomile Lawn, spend her last years in Totnes.

Discoverer William John Wills of Burke and Wills famous exhibition was nuclear physicist in Totnes. In the 1950-60s, Bruce Montgomery (pen name Edmund Crispin), movie componist and playwright, was living in Totnes. Half Man Half Biscuit's 2008 CSI: Ambleside contains a track named Totnes Bickering Fair. "Totnes property:

Returned on August 15, 2009. Totnes Municipality 2011. Brought back on February 20, 2015. Totnes Bridgetown Station 2011. Brought back on February 20, 2015. "Trojans in Devon." Brutus Stone on the front of 51/53 Totnes. Brought back on October 20, 2015. "Trojans in Devon." "907-1523: The City of the King". Heart of Totnes.

Devon. "Devon's 14th-century harbor towns." The New Maritime History of Devon; vol. 1: From early days to the end of the 18th centuries. Totnes Guildhall Archives July 22, 2011 at the Wayback Machine. Totnes Guildhall Archives July 14, 2012 at Archive. is, Visit Britain, UK.

The Transitional Movement: Totnes today... the future the world". Returned on November 30, 2017. Devon County Council election 2009. County Council. Returned on June 18, 2009. Welcome to Totnes City Council. Municipality of Totnes. Returned on July 2, 2008. Returned on July 2, 2008. Brought back on December 26, 2013. That'?s Devon.

Returned on May 29, 2013. Buildings of England - Devon. Totnes the good city (second imprint with introductory ed.). A Visitors Guide - South Devon Railway. The South Devon Railway Trust. pp. 23-28. Returned on July 2, 2008. Returned on July 9, 2016. "Not only do they buy locally in Totnes - they have their own currency".

Returned on July 2, 2008. The BBC Devon News. Returned on August 16, 2009. Totnes Town Trail. Southern Devon territory of exceptional natural beauty. Returned on July 2, 2008. Totnes Elisabethan House Museum. The Devon Museums Group. Returned on July 2, 2008. Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study for a section Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case Study Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study for a section Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case from my Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study from my Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case from my Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study my Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case from my Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study from Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case My Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study See Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case Language Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study Language Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case Tan Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case study See Local Food and Relocalisation : a Totnes case T forth : une

Transitional culture. Returned on July 9, 2016. ikimedia Commons has Totnes related medias.

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