The area of Myanmar

Myanmar area

By comparison, the area occupied by Myanmar is slightly smaller than the state of Texas. Then, in areas that few foreigners see, there is the fascinating possibility of getting off the tourist path. Environmental history of the Chatthin Wildlife Sanctuary, a protected area in Myanmar (Burma). Burma, also known as Myanmar, remains one of the poorest countries in Asia. The second week of our work will take place in the Yangon area of Myanmar.

Forested area ('% of the total area)

Forests ('% of Myanmar's total area) were 44. Forests are an area under a minimum of 5 m of naturally or cultivated stand, whether or not in place, and exclude standings in farming subsystems (e.g. orchards and agro-forestry systems) and in municipal parklands and orchards.

Forestry is one of the main causes of biological diversity decline and the protection of habitats is essential to halt this decline. In the world as a whole, more than a third of all forests are primarily forests, i.e. forests of indigenous types in which there is no clearly discernible evidence of mankind's activity and the environmental process is not significantly upset.

The most biodiverse and varied land eco-systems are found in virgin woodlands, especially in wetlands. Decline in forested area, . Over a ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year ten-year period is mainly due to the reclassification of the primary forest as "other naturally regenerated forests" due to selective logging and other human interventions. The FAO calculates that the 0.4 per cent decline in the area of virgin woodland over a ten-year timeframe is largely due to the classification of virgin woodland as "other natural regeneration forests" due to selected felling and other man-made activities.

The widespread plantation of woodland significantly reduces the net depletion of woodland worldwide and the reforestation and extension of woodland in some lands and areas has significantly decreased the net depletion of woodland on a worldwide basis. The forested area covers about 31 per cent of the world's entire surface area; the world's entire forested area is just over 4 billion Hec.

In the world as a whole, more than a third of all woods are primarily forested, i.e. indigenous woods in which there is no clearly discernible evidence of man-made activity and where the environmental process is not significantly upset. The most biodiverse and varied land eco-systems are found in virgin woodlands, especially in wetlands.

In the majority of lands and areas, more than 10 per cent of the entire woodland area is covered by nature reserve, wildlife reserve, wildlife preserve and other statutory protection areas. The FAO puts the number of forestry workers at around 10 million, but many more depend directly on forestry for their livelihood.

Almost 1.2 billion ha of woodland are mainly used for the cultivation of timber and non-woods. Another 25 per cent of the forested area is earmarked for multi-use - in most cases also for the manufacture of timber and non-wood goods. Since 1990, the area declared mainly for agricultural use has fallen by more than 50 million ha, as other uses of woodland have been declared.

The FAO has been gathering and analysing information on woodland since 1946. The Global Forestry Resources Assessment (FRA) is conducted every 5-10 years. The FAO is reporting for 229 lands and areas; for the other 56 small islands and areas where no information is provided, the FAO is preparing a reporting using available information and a bibliographic research.

FAO's FRA teams aggregate the information at sub-regional, provincial and world level and estimate it by direct addition. Differences between the base year and real output of the datasets, as well as the incidence of output, vary from country to country. The cleared areas are areas not cleared for recovery or areas damaged by firewood collection, sour rainfall or fire.

The number of negatives point to an increased forested area. The data include areas of woodland and palm groves; woodland paths, fire lanes and other small open spaces; forests in natural areas, natural preserves and other areas of special natural, historic, cultural as well as intellectual interest; wind protection areas, shelters and tree passageways over 0.5 ha and more than 20 metres wide; tree nurseries mainly used for silvicultural or conservation activities, such as gum tree groves and corks.

Nondescaptive datasets in farm produce schemes such as orchards and agriforest. The forested area also rules out the use of municipal park and gardening. It calculates the share of woodland in the overall area and calculates changes in the share to detect trend. Forests are defined both by the existence of indigenous forests and by the lack of other dominant uses of landholdings.

Afforestation areas that have not yet been achieved but are likely to be covered by a roof of 10 per cent and a treetop of 5 metres in length, as well as areas that are not planted with trees and that have been created by man or due to normal causes and are likely to be regenerated. FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) provides detailed information on forestry coverage and appropriate estimations of it.

It uses a common forestry concept. While the FAO provides a distribution of the coverage of forests between forests and plantations for less developed nations, the forestry information used to deduce these indicator values does not mirror this distribution. The entire area of the country does not comprise any fresh waters such as large streams and seas.

Deviations from year to year may be due more to updating or revision of figures than to changes in the area. This indicator is obtained by splitting the entire forested area of a given state by the entire area of the state and the multiplication by 100.

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