Tetouan Medina

The Tetouan Medina

Tétouan's Medina (formerly Titawin). Tétouan's Medina (Old Town) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Explore the medina of Tétouan in Tétouan, Morocco:

Tétouan Medina (formerly Titawin)

Tetouan was of particular importance in the Muslim era from the eighth to the eighth centuries, as it was used as the principal point of communication between Morocco and Andalusia. The city was reconquered by Spanish displaced people. It is exemplified by his artwork and architectural style, which have a clear Andalucian impact.

Though it is one of the smallest of Morocco's medicinal plants, it is without doubt the most comprehensive and largely unaffected by later external factors. Tetouan was of particular importance during the Islamic period, from the 8th century, as the main hub between Morocco and Andalusia.

Although it is one of the smallest in Morocco, its medina is undoubtedly the most complete and the safest from external influences. In the Islamic period from the 8th century onwards, Tetouan was particularly important because it was the most important link between Morocco and Andalusia.

Although Tétouan has one of Morocco's smallest medinas, the city is the most complete and least affected by later external influences. The medina of Tétouan is surrounded by a five kilometre long historical wall and is accessible through seven gates. Tétouan's medina was built on the precipitous Jebel Dersa hills.

It had a special significance in the Muslim era from the eighth to the eighth centuries, when it was used as a link between Morocco and Andalusia. Following the recapture, the city was reconstructed by Spanish displaced people. It is exemplified by his artwork and architectural style, which have a clear Andalucian impact.

One of the smallest of Morocco's media, but undeniably the most completed and most of its monuments have not been affected by later external factors. Tétouan's medina is encircled by a 5 km long historical barrier and is accessible through seven highways.

It is characterized by major roads connecting the doors and providing easy accessibility to open areas (squares and small squares) and common areas such as foundations, museums, mosques, central courtyards, craftsmen's and business areas and smaller alleys that lead to arcades and semi-private homes.

The historical city of Tétouan is a real fusion of Algarve and Andalusia culture and presents some of the specialities of the city and architecture that shaped the architectonic and artistical evolution during the Spanish Protectorate. Tétouan is renowned for its Dar Sanaa (School of Applied Arts) and its National Institute of Fine Art, which bear witness to a handed down traditions and an opening to today's modernity.

Tétouan's medina testifies to the important impact of Andalusia' civilisation at the end of the Middle Ages in the Muslim Occident. It is reflected in the development of architectural design, monuments and urbanism. Tétouan's medina is an excellent example of a mediterranean seaside walled city constructed against a northern mountainous area.

The city is a testimony to the settlement's ancient history and in Muslim times it became the only link between the Iberian Peninsula and the interior of Morocco. From the beginning of the seventeenth to the end of the eighteenth centuries, its growth is mirrored in the fortification, the architectural style, the fusion of Algarve and Andalusia culture and the city.

Tétouan's medina's strategic location opposite the Strait of Gibraltar was an important point of intersection and junction between two civilisations (Spanish and Arabic) and two main cultures (Europe and North Africa). A number of the features need to be preserved and have precedence when it comes to the preservation of the city walls, doors and the fortifications.

It is working with the Government of Andalusia (Spain) to carry out rehabilitative work in the Medina area. Its authentic character is demonstrated by its unspoilt, virtually untouched ground plans and pristine architectural form with walls, gateways and fortifications around it. Medina has an unique city structure, characterized by the street hierarchies and the distribution of living, business and craft areas according to a clearly identified itinerary.

Safeguard activities are mainly governed by the various legislation on the list of historical sights and places, in particular Law 22-80 (1981) on the preservation of Morocco's heritages. Municipalities, urban development departments, municipalities and the Ministry of Culture are in charge of the administration and maintenance of the area.

The Ministry of Culture is in charge of the general maintenance of the culture and supports the various ministries in their activities to preserve and preserve the medina. Methodologies and priority areas for this maintenance are defined by the guidelines and guidelines made in the context of the Tétouan City Masters.

Tétouan's medina region and community land-use plan was drawn up by the Ministry of Housing and Design in 1982 and gives high priority to the preservation and restoration of the medina. In February 1996, the North-West Region Plan of Urban and Architectural Design was drawn up by the Directorate of Urban Affairs and Design with the aim of preserving and rehabilitating the Médinas.

Since the end of 2006, the establishment of the Regional Directorates for Culture has strengthened the integration of nature protection policies into regional developments. Tétouan medina plan contains rules for preservation and exploitation and takes into consideration the area' s general value.

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