Shwe Sar Umbrella Workshop

Umbrella Shwe Sar Workshop

Parasols are made in workshops scattered throughout the northern part of the city, especially around 28 Paya, in front of Mahabandoola Rd. The Shwe Sar is a traditional roof workshop in Pathein that produces various types of Pathein umbrellas, including the designs used in the Bagan and Mandalay era. Umbrella Workshop #instamyanmar. Workshop Shwe Sar Umbrella, Myanmar (Burma). His first parasol workshop in Pathein started in his small backyard.

The Shwe Sar

The Shwe Sar is a roof workshop in Pathein that produces different types of Pathein umbrellas, among them the ones used in the Bagan and Mandalay years. We ask our employees to work independent of home for the manufacture of some parts of the glider. Our company takes over all stages of manufacture, work on the umbrella frame included.

The Shwe Sar is a roof workshop in Pathein that produces different types of Pathein umbrellas, among them the ones used in the Bagan and Mandalay years. We ask our employees to work independent of home for the manufacture of some parts of the glider. Our company takes over all stages of manufacture, work on the umbrella frame included.

Canopies are available from 4 inch in height and 12 ft in length. Tharagu" is made of natural materials such as natural materials such as natural materials such as natural materials such as natural materials such as natural coconut. Export to other countriesIn July 2013, we were awarded an honourable mention by the President of the Union of Myanmar for the maintenance of our heritage of umbrella manufacture for over 100 years and the worldwide recognition of our work.

Our gliders are exported to Spain, Germany, Italy, France and Thailand. Three new designs produced annuallyFor postproduction inspection of product safety, the holder checks while the management carries out the inspection in various stages. It will take about 10 working nights to produce up to 10 different size canopies.

Each year we are producing about three new styles. We do not take part in domestic or international fairs and only see international customers in their workshop or in exports after we have established contacts.

The Myanmar Times | The Myanmar Times

We were in a mini van with three native buddies, and we were on a quest through the city. The city of Pathein is the 4th biggest city area of the state, the capitol of the Ayeyarwady region and a vibrant harbour in the center of the travel business of the Danube area. Attempting to get our hand on a copy of a particular Myanmar story.

A trained guardian in the fraternity told us that the knowledge-hungry citizens of Pathein used to borrow but not return them, thus releasing the rally into non-existence. The last place we hoped was a secret culture muse. However, none of the four Patheinians we asked knew that there was a local arsenal.

Luck was smiling at us when we saw a bi-lingual signage for the Ayeyarwady Region Cultural Centre as we drove past Mahabandoola Road, two blocks from Strand Road. Founded in 2012, the school had no book but a series of colorful and richly pictured text boards with useful information about the branches of industry for which the area is renowned, such as rice growing, producing salts, matting, Halawar cuisine and, of course, sunshade making.

However, the few tables that dealt with "history" provided some dubious theory as fact, which included the much-discussed assertion that pyu civilization spread to areas in the south of Myanmar that are historically anchored in the Mon Civilization. It is a magnificent and intolerable effort to politicize archeology that goes back to the darkness of regime and should probably be transferred to the repository of publicity rather than to a monument.

Okay, well, let's just drop the story of Pathein. So we left the factory and spent the remainder of the evening taking pictures in the town. Approximately three mins. after agreeing on this procedure, the rains began to strike us from the skies and stopped only 15 mins. after sunset, whereupon we got some pictures of the humble nocturnal vegetables fair along the rivier.

The next morning our destination was to see the Mawtinsoun pit at the south-western tip of the Ayeyarwady region. Travelling by ferry on the Pathein is possible for natives and aliens for only3500. This will require an night near the sea front pit before she returns to Pathein the next morning, and the need to call the district authority in advance to organise essential monastery accommodations for travelers.

We were surprised by the total absence of equipment when we had seen a Coca-Cola van driving back to Pathein 30 mins before. The Mawtin Point has two gold pagodas: Mawtinsoun pagoda on a hill with a view of the ocean and Phaung Daw Oo about 100 meters off the coast. This pagoda is teeming with activities during the season's Mawtinsoun Pagoda Festival, which takes place the weeks before the full-moon of the moon months of Tabaung (February or March).

It was tempting to condemn the bad wheather, as my attempts to take photos were hampered by constant fighting to check my windswept umbrella with one handed while I was swinging my cameras with the other. I would have loved the couch potato event much more if I hadn't felt obliged to remember the event with my digital still cameras and given myself the liberty to unwind, get soaked and capture the instant in my own mind instead of on an SD-tag.

1 megapixel slaves just taking a break to lit some candle lights at a cabinet under the nosy eyes of a pigeon-loving, older caretaker who was happily and helpfully as you seldom see outside Myanmar. Climbing down a cliffy, small staircase from Mawtinsoun, we paddled along a path of seaweed covered gravel to Phaung Daw Oo.

We hurried back to Pathein at full but dissatisfied stomachs, motivated by the promises of a proper supper and a few beers in less than five-hour. The last days in Pathein started with sunshine and light. When we had our breakfasts on the roof of the Htike Myat San Motel, we could see tens of herons sleeping in an extensive forest near the meander.

The good wheather we used to collect the pictures we had lost on our first day: the quiet Shwemokhtaw Pagoda, the wooded facade of St. Peter's, the overcrowded central market. The decaying exhibitions of the governments were ignored by the public and the porticoes in front of each of the pavilions were confiscated instead by young pairs cuddling and speaking behind stateworst.

Of course we could not have left Pathein without a visit to the Shwe Sar sunshade workshop. And they wanted to tell the long story of their company: how U Shwe Sar was King Thibaw's regal sunshade manufacturer, but was compelled to abandon Mandalay after the British took over the town in 1885.

After fleeing southwards along the Ayeyarwady River, he settled in Pathein and rebuilt his workshop in his back yard. Initially U Shwe Sar made sunshades in trade for travel, but later he developed the company into a more sustainable company that was handed down to today's people.

This was a beautiful, exciting tale that gave our workshop tour a vital and contextual touch. It seems that the best travel guides to Pathein are still the humans themselves.

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