Nld Government

The Nld Government

(??mjóðá dìmòk??èsì ?

?p?w?d?o??]; abbreviated NLD) is a social-democratic and liberal-democratic political party in Myanmar (Burma) that currently functions as a ruling party. A year ago, the new government came to power. Myanmar's government, led by the National League for Democracy (NLD), has been in office for more than a year now, with Aung San Suu Kyi as de facto head of government. While Myanmar's foreign policy under the NLD government will keep the survival and security of the state at its core, it will not be aimed at the close interest of the regime's survival, but at the welfare of the state and society in Myanmar. Her remarks at the Union peace conference in January and the NLD election manifesto both indicate that ethnicity and federalism are linked.

bc/cp="mw-headline" id="History">History< class="mw-editsection-bracket">[edit]>>

She was led by Aung San Suu Kyi, a key member of Burma's 1940' independent struggle, the Aung Sanda. At the 1990 general election, the National Unity won 59% of the votes and 392 out of 492 controversial votes, as opposed to 10 won by the ruling National Unity Party.

However, the reigning army juvenile regime (formerly SLORC, later known as the State Peace and Development Council or SPDC) did not allow the political parties to establish a government. That was her state for 16 of the close 21 gathering until her merchandise on November 13, 2010. However, some high-ranking NLD members evaded detention and constituted the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma (NCGUB).

Suu Kyi also called for judicial autonomy, full liberty for the press and an increase in welfare services, including litigation-costs. Organized since the rebellion against Burma's UK settlement in 1948, years before Burma's independent regime, this students' association had been playing an important policy in Burma, and Daw Aung San Suu Kyi's deceased aung san (General Aung San) was one of the former president of Rangoon University's students' work.

Dawson Aung San Suu Kyi et la Ligue nationale pour la démocratie. Frangos, Alex; Patrick Barta (March 30, 2012). Accessed April 2, 2012. Archiveed from the orginal on August 7, 2011. Archives from the orginal on November 18, 2014. Archive copy" (PDF). Archive (PDF) from the 3 March 2016 version.

Released December 24, 2014. May 4, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on April 27, 2011. Accessed November 11, 2010. Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi - World News - IBNLive". May 10, 2011. Archiveed from the orginal on April 6, 2012. Accessed April 5, 2012. April 2, 2012. Archives from the orginal on December 29, 2016.

Accessed January 30, 2017. Accessed April 30, 2018. Archives from the orginal (PDF) from June 14, 2007. Accessed November 20, 2011. Archives from the orginal on December 3, 2016. Released December 3, 2016. Archives from the orginal on December 3, 2016. Released December 3, 2016. Archives from the orginal on December 3, 2016.

Released December 3, 2016. May 7, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on September 14, 2013. Accessed May 7, 2010. November 8, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on December 11, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011. October 12, 2011. Archiveed from the orginal on November 18, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011. October 14, 2011.

Archiveed from the orginal on November 18, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011. November 18, 2011. Archiveed from the orginal on November 19, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011. Whitlock, Craig (November 19, 2011). Archives from the orginal on 28 July 2013. Accessed November 19, 2011. November 30, 2011. Archiveed from the orginal on November 30, 2011.

Accessed December 1, 2011. November 18, 2011. Archiveed from the orginal on November 18, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011. "The Aung San Suu Kyi faction rules out Moslem candidates." Archives from the orginal on November 22, 2015. Accessed January 3, 2016. Aung San Suu Kyi freed. November 13, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on November 16, 2010.

November 14, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on November 17, 2010. Archiveed from the orginal on April 6, 2012. Accessed April 5, 2012. Hla Tun, Aung (July 3, 2010). Archiveed from the orginal on November 16, 2011. Accessed November 19, 2011.

Auch interessant

Mehr zum Thema