Myanmarese or Burmese

Burmese or Myanmaric

Anyone of Myanmar (Burma) or Myanmar descent. A number of English speakers have even coined the adjectives "Myanmarese" or "Myanmese" to follow English rather than Burmese grammatical rules. Is it Myanmar or Burma, Myanmar or Burma? No Myanmarese or other stupid things to think of. This video shows what Myanmarese means.

Proper pronunciation of Burmese and Myanmar words - Myanmar Forum

The thread has been discontinued due to apathy. Hopefully you will join the discussion by publishing an open subject or start a new one. If we do not comply with our policies, we will delete any postings and we retain the right to delete postings for any cause.

MYANMAR, SPEECHES, PEOPLE, POPULATION

Myanmar's tribe is known as the Burmese (fortunately, the general has not changed the nation's name along with the name of the country). Myanmar is both a substantive (singular and plural) and an adjective. No. Myanmar is the largest city in Myanmar and its population. Some call Myanmaris, Myanmaris or Myanmarese.

Myanmar has a total of 55 million inhabitants (estimated in 2013). Roughly 25 per cent of Burmese are living in city areas (compared to 76 per cent in the United States). Most of the other 75 per cent are in small farming communities. There is only 1.8 per cent growth in the country's annual populations.

It has an annual lifespan of 61 years, and about 36% of Burmese are under 15 years of age and 4% are over 60. Burmese (Bamaren or Burmese) are related to Tibetans and make up 68 per cent of the people. Burmese speakers mainly reside in the Myanmar plains.

Karen, Kachin, Chin and other tribes are living in the hills around the plain. Burma is one of the most ethnic rich nations in the run. Up to 30-40 per cent of the total ethnicity. Shan are the biggest group ('9 percent). It lives in northeastern Myanmar.

The Karens (7 percent), who are living in the eastern part; the Rashkine or Arakanese (4 percent), who are living in the western part: the Chin (2 percent), the Mon (2 percent), the Kachin (1.5 percent) and the Chinese (3 percent) and the Indians (2 percent). Approximately 5 per cent of the rest of the country's inhabitants are minority groups such as the Kayahs, Wa, Naga, Lahu and Lisu.

Burmese traditions have been to live mainly in riverbanks and plateaus, especially on the Irrawaddy Riviera, while the smaller minority communities have been living in the uplands. Bad communication and transport have led to the isolation of different communities and the formation of Burmese lowlanders. A lot of highlanders have never been to the low-lying country and vice versa. 2.

There are many other minority groups living in the Mon state. One third of the Karens lives in Karen state, two third in Burma. Myanmar has very few foreign nationals and they are mainly Indian and Chinese. The Myanmar administration says the Bamar consist of nine ethnical groups: Bamar, Dawei, Beik, Yaw, Yabein, Kadu, Ganan, Salon, Hpon.

Some of the most important vernaculars are Merguese (Mergui, Beik), Yaw, Danu (Taruw), Burmese, Palaw. The Merguese (250,000), Danu (100,000) and Yaw (20,000) can be different tongues and are different strains (Bradley 1997). They are entangled by males and females king by them named "Keinayee & Keinayah". Kayah, Kayin, Shan, Kachin, Chin wives bind a nice ribbon on the bamar heads, Mon and Radhine wives carry pretty cathedrals in their coat.

Burmese tribes - the tribe that reigned Pagan and dominated Myanmar today - did not come to Burma until the ninth World War. Ancients of the Laotian, Thai and possibly Burmese and Cambodian peoples come from the South. The Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhism was established in South East Asia at the times of Christ, when Thailand and South Burma were populated by persons called Mons.

Inhabitant /km2 populations (2005):65.2. Myanmar is one of the most sparsely inhabited Asian nations with a resident populace of 40 million who live in the farmland along the Irrawaddy and Salween Creeks. 77 male/female; E) Overall population: Myanmar has several hundred different tongues and idioms.

The Myanmar administration says Burma has some 107 different nationalities" that refer to the separation of nationalities. "Every ethnical group has a different tongue or a different accent. The majority of these are categorized as Tai (various vernaculars used in Shan states), Mon-Khmer (spoken in South Burma ) and some Hindi tongues used in the Occident.

A number of minority groups don't know Burmese and others don't. Although Burma was once a colonization of Britain, fewer English speakers in Myanmar than in other former UK states. However, enough of the large touristic areas have enough talk so you shouldn't have much difficulty being heard. Teaching in non-Burmese is often prohibited in Myanmar school.

During the first years after the country's liberation, Burma had an extended community of mission schooling employing overseas instructors who were teaching England and other disciplines. During the 1960' Ne Win ordered that the colonisers should no longer teach in school. Myanmar is the most widely spread and officially recognized tongue in the country.

Speaking by about 70 per cent of the people, it is the Tibetan-Burmese locale, a subset of the Chinese-Tibetan linguistic familiy that also encompasses Kachin, Chin and several indigenous tongues in the Myanmar-China boarder area. Burmese, the native of the Bamar, is related verbally to either Taiwanese or China.

Burmese includes the common use of honors and is age-oriented. It is estimated that only 65 per cent of the Burmese people speak Burmese. There' s a smaller Burmese-speaking ethnical group known as Baramagyi (or Barua). Myanmar is a five-note Tonic like Thai, Mandarin and Vietnamese (which means that words or phrases with similar sounds have different meanings according to the high, low, ascending, descending or flat note or key of the sound).

Myanmar has three major notes (high, low and creaking) and two additional notes (stopped and reduced). Myanmar is very hard to understand, even if you have a phrasebook. Chinese translation is dominant in China and Southeast Asia. 1 ) Tibeto-Burman, 2) Tai and 3) Sinitian, among them many of the Chinese used.

A peculiarity of all Chinese-Tibetan is that most words are composed of a simple word-syllabic. For Tibetans and Chinamen, multi-syllable words are just as inconceivable as words with only consonant for Englishspeakers. The tonality of Sino-Tibetan language means that the meanings of the words can vary with the pitches in which they are used.

Although Burma was once a colonization of Britain, fewer Burmese speakers in Myanmar than in other former UK states. However, enough of the large touristic areas have enough talk so you shouldn't have much difficulty being heard. "Hello " and "David Beckham" are probably the best known words in Myanmar.

Teaching in non-Burmese is often prohibited in Myanmar school. During the first years after the country's liberation, Burma had an extended community of mission schooling employing overseas instructors who were teaching England and other disciplines. During the 1960' Ne Win ordered that the colonisers should no longer be teaching in school.

Karen is related to Burmese. He is a member of the Mon Khmer Group of Austro-Asian Language. Myanmar and Thailand are the two countries of origin. Myanmar has its own unique script and numerical system, both of which look like many ribbons and curls (signs, papers and writing are sometimes in English, but not always).

Myanmar is used in a font of round and semicircular characters from the Mon family. Burmese lettering adopted the Mon typeface, which in turn was derived from a South India typeface in the 700s. Burmese writing's oldest known epigraphs date back to the 1000s.

Scripture is also used to spell Pali, the holy tongue of Theravada Buddhism. Burmese is also used to spell several minorities such as Shan, several Karen and Kayah (Karenni), with the inclusion of special and diacritical signs for each one. Bales of lettering from the leaves of palms are then wraped in a fabric reel named Sar Palwe with a rib.

Packaged in a large wooden case named Sar Taik, which means as much as a carton. Today many are no longer acquainted with handwritten handwriting or parabai. Burmese don't have last names.

This symbolises the special virtues of a given individual and the amazing computation of the weekday on which the individual was conceived, on the basis of the Burmese calender year. Choosing the name is of enormous importance to the Burmese population. To a certain degree, the same tradition of naming human beings also applied to places that have nothing to do with the creation of Tsar Tar, but with the construction of a memorial, gravestone or icon, a piece of historic information that has been handed down from generations to generations.

Occasionally, local residents could give a name to a character next to their first name. Generally nicknames are cadent, rhythmical, sometime insulting to a human being, a pets name can even be given by boyfriends, but the phenomena of invoking a boyfriend or another nicknamed is not a peculiar practice in Myanmar community.

Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : chill Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : chill ; 2) any words Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : chill Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : Some words aus Myanmar Namen (Myanmar Name, englische Bedeutung : 1) anye : chill ; 2) any words ; 3) hinhlaing ; 4). It is customary in Myanmar to call a foreigner with the appropriate terms "brother", "sister", "uncle", "aunt", "grandfather", "grandmother".

Unlike other Western civilisations, Myanmar has a tradition of privileging Myanmar wives by priding themselves on their liberty and not having to name themselves when they get remarried. The Myanmar tribe is never aware that it is a necessary tradition to abide by it.

The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Times of London, Lonely Planet Guides, The Irrawaddy, Myanmar Travel Information Compton's Encyclopedia, The Guardian, National Geographic, Myanmar Travel Information, The New Yorker, Time, Newsweek, Reuters, AP, AFP, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic Monthly, The Economist, Global Viewpoint (Christian Science Monitor), Foreign Policy, Burmallibrary, United States.

Auch interessant

Mehr zum Thema