Kuala Kangsar

The Kuala Kangsar

Kuala Kangsar is the royal city of Perak, Malaysia. Kuala Kangsar (KK) is the epicenter for some of Malaysia's most important moments and the royal seat of Perak. City of Kuala Kangsar, Northwest Peninsula (West) Malaysia. Coming from Kuala Lumpur we head north towards Ipoh. Kuala Kangsar is served by numerous intercity buses.

History[edit]

Kuala Kangsar is the king city of Perak, Malaysia. Situated on the Kangsar River below, where it flows into the Perak River, about 25 km to the north-west of Ipoh, the Perak capitol, and 98 km south-east of George town, Penang. This is the capitol of the Kuala Kangsar county.

Situated about 235 km from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Unlike many sovereigns, who guarded their kingly mansions and fortresses by choosing their viewpoints with care, which allowed them to recognize the enemy's remote rapprochement, the Sultan had his first kingly mansion constructed next to the river bank.

Then he called it "Istana Sri Sayong". Kuala Kangsar is said to derive its name from "Kuala Kurang-Sa", which means literal "100 minus (-) one", usually meaning "the small river 99 that flows into the Perak River". A flood was so heavy it almost blew the place away.

Eventually, after the Great Flood or the 1926 Air Station, it was resolved to move the site further up the hill, where today's Royal Palace called Istana Iskandariah is located with its Art Deco style buildings, a unique but significant architectonic landmark in Malaysia. The Kuala Kangsar is also known in Malaysia's past as the place where the first conference of rulers, the Durbar, took place in 1897.

In the 1890s, the expansion of the pewter mine cities of Ipoh and Taiping had put Kuala Kangsar in the shade, but it is still one of the most appealing of Malaysia's king cities. In the city there is also the first natural caoutchouc stand that has been grown in Malaysia. Kuala Kangsar was the birthplace of the first Malays scouts group.

There are now two footbridges connecting Kuala Kangsar with Sayong. The Sultan Abdul Jalil Shah Bridge is made of cement and is near the city, while the Sultan Iskandar Bridge is further up the river and is made of carbon-fibre. The Kuala Kangsar is easy to reach via the North-South Expressway and by rail.

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