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????? ????????????????? ???????????????? Free download of the online library: Free online lessons for Burmese. British Council has a wide range of free online resources to help adults, young people and children learn English. These FREE online Burmese/Myanmar language lessons have basic greetings, messages, directions and numbers. It' easy to send money to Myanmar.

Free online lesson in Burma

Myanmar language with Myanmar writing, sound, PDF and unmatched grammatical colour coding: substantives, accents, verbs, adverse words, adjectives, conjunction, particle, postpositional marker, interjection while working as a trial technician at Hewlett-Packard in Singapore. He is currently helping to promote tourism in Myanmar by making his online education available to all.

The Koun 3 "coun" as in " counselite " have long recognized the resemblances between the Myanmar dialect and the Sri Lankan one. As an example, the sounds of ka, ya, kha, ga, qa, nga, qa, yes, ny, ta, thai, da, na, pa, phah, ba, ba, ma, wa, qha, za, ya, ra, la, sh, sa, ha, etc. are remarkable similar to those of Burma's syndons.

Myanmar and Tibet Arabic's Mon and Pyu can be attributed to the Brahmi typeface of old India, which was first seen in 500 BC and extended throughout India under the rule of King Ashoka in 300 AD. It is a part of the Chinese-Tibetan linguistic group, which is from Tibet to the Malay Peninsula and is also known as Tibeto-Burman Language.

Myanmar's languages are different from the literature. The Myanmar literature has more expression than dull words, but the order in the phrase hierarchy is essentially the same. Myanmar kri1-ya2 is not changing like in English. Myanmar verb is categorised according to three kinds of syntax constructs and also according to the following three characteristics:

" It' possible to build Myanmar phrases without a verse. Notice: The last digit in the above block is not a ver. In Myanmar language it is considered a particulate. The Myanmar Grammar has a series of extensions and end words named wi1-but (postpositional markers) and pyit-si3 (particles).

Mystery of the fundamental meaning of the Myanmar tongue does NOT necessarily come in the subject-object ver-statement. These post-positional marker, which are also used as end words, together with the particulates are important in Myanmar's linguistic structures. The last example uses the endword NO verbs, but it does modify the adjective to be the verbs of typ pfyit-chin3-pya1 kri1-ya2 (verb term indicating the occurrence) in the words of the words phyit-chin3-ya2.

We must emphasize that the Myanmar equivalents of "be/is/are/am" like diear2 are not verses, but post-positional marks, and they only appear in combinations with verses like "go", "eat", "come" or addicts like "white", "wrong", "hungry". For some other typesetting constructs they cannot be interpreted as "be/is/are/am", which can be bewildering for non-native Myanmarers.

Concerning the pronouns2-za3, there are many ways to say you and me in Myanmar. Eight ways to categorise Burma's nouns "nun2": four by design and four by meaning:

It is the htu3-choon2 verse, which means "be outstanding" and is converted into a substantive by the extension Partikel amu1. In contrast to English, where most folks have to search the vocabulary for the octopus plurals, Burma's abbreviations just adds post nouns like da2 to the slang and dya3 to the literal one.

This is a cross-referencing between Myanmar and Mandarin Chinese pinyin notes. Look at the three stages of congestion in Burma: Ma1 = sound like "Ma" in "Malaysia" Ma2 = "ma" as in "diploma" Ma3= higher pitches of "Ma" as in "Mother" For those who are conversant with Mandarin Chinese, tight pinyin notes are pendants:

¿Ma1 = pinyin 4. sound. M a2 = sound like pinyin 3. sound as in "ma3 lu", which in Mandarin Chinese means "the highroad. M3 = Higher pitches and near the pinyin 1. or 2. notes as in "Ma2 fan", which means "disturbing" in Mandarin Chinese. More clarification on "a1" If you give great care to report writers on the wireless, you will notice that some end words in Myanmar phrases are not exactly pronounced in a shallow monotonous voice, but from a lower to a higher standard something like the Pinyin 2.

The end term used by the speakers of the radionews, for example, almost always changes from Shin 2 to a higher tone height within fractions of a second Shin 3. It is clear enough if the Myanmar symbol "Ma1" is used as an independent symbol, it will sound like "Mah1" ("Mark" with quiet "rk".) It is clear enough if this is used at the end of the words (or sentences), or is displayed as an independent symbol.

But when " Ma1 " at the beginning or in the center of words, it sounds in most cases (but not all) like a brief "Ma1 " as in "Malaysia", not like "Mah-laysia". There is no way to distinguish the full "Mah1" tone from the brief "Ma1" in Moroccan notation. Not even Myanmar has to look at the situation to see if the words Ma1 Ni-2 La-2 Manila (city in the Philippines) or a maiden name Mah-1 Ni-2 La-2 (woman Nilar) should be used.

Another example is the writing of the noun "favoritism" with the 33nd sign of Burma (Ah1), followed by the third sign (Ga1) and the words "Ti1". An unlearned Myanmar kid would not know whether to say this as AA1Gah1TI1, or Aga1TI1 or Agati1, or the right pronounciation that could be better pronounced in romanisation as AA1ga1-ti1 with full AA1 and shortlyAga1.

This could also be put as Uh1ati1, but there is still the option to mispronounce the mean as" good" instead of the proper short" ga1". Now I see this as an occasion to further improve Romanisation by possibly including an" h" in the a1" as well. So I can better pronounce the term "Kah1 ba2" (please dance) and distinguish it from "Ka1 ba2" (the world).

Also, please be aware that end words like "ba2" would be more smooth if you could easily expand it and lengthen it to "ba3". In Myanmar, it is the most used type. Currently, many Unicode compliant fonts are available in Burma. Previously, before the spread of the use of the web in Myanmar, there was no problem with the use of the letter in standalone PCs.

However, it can still be used for PC, and there is still the option of choosing the typeface for the Myanmar population. Myanmar characters used to encode pages on this site are Unicode-compatible. Is it a figment of the army rule or did they simply return to the initial term? Study the offical languages of over 53 million over Myanmar - the land of the fast and strong - the most spacious nation in the world for the FOURTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR 2017.

In Myanmar, English is widely spoken in institutions that have frequent contacts with foreign nationals, such as hospitals, restaurants, hotels in Myanmar and many more. Communicating at a lower echelon, mingled with the crowds and developing warm relations without the help of an translator is a clear plus. When it comes to the writing, Burmese is the voice of almost all of Myanmar's 11 million Facebook visitors to get together to discuss opinions, thoughts and information, sharing valuable reminiscences of the past and present, expressing joy and sadness about the "now" situation and singing the hymn of hopes for the dawn of many days to come.

It is the vocabulary of charity, the vocabulary of hatred and the vocabulary of a colourful range of personal emotion to boast, complain and leave out frustration online among the Myanmar population. Myanmar is the fastestgrowing Asian country as a result of a range of policy and macroeconomic reform that began in 2011.

Myanmar " is not a 1989 army rule creature. The website, which offers free online teaching of Burma, has grown and developed over the years. Following a proposal, Learn Myanmar Script now ranks among the best on this site Google, Yahoo! bingo, AOL, Ask, LYCOS, Yandex and Norton Safe Search.

The times are over when most Burmese learners wanted to learn just one or two sentences for a brief trip to Myanmar. Not only are they ambassadors, but more and more businesses working with international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), non-native Myanmar speaking citizens with a nearly unknown commercial visas a decade ago, and scholars, military officials, embassies and businesses students at York University in Yangon and the MUFL in Mandalay Myanmar.

ENVERYDAY SPOKING enveryday spoking Myanmar PDF (Rev. B) is for those who seriously learn to learn to read and communicate in a very brief speek. The most basic elements of the Myanmar vernacular are covered. More than 400 eight-page eight-page MP-33 sound tracks from Lesson 62 are available online. There are 3 sounds in the Myanmar dialect.

While the first note can best be described as a brief statement, the second is without tension in it. Burmese has a kind of persistent stressful third note. It' almost as if you need more lung space and more neck power to get the third note out.

For the Burmese 1,2,3-tone system with the symbol "ka1", the referee chart is available for free reading. It is a recap of the Myanmar Script Learning Guide in Unit 33. The colour coded "blue" was used to indicate the vocal and " rot " as the beep. Gelber Hintergrund indicates the basis for a certain Vokal, from which the notes can be altered.

Let us look at the soundtrack of the first "a" in "America". That'?s the first note. This is the example for the second note. It' like "Ar" without the "r" in " Artist". That'?s the third note. First 3 notes with the vowel "A" are..... Oh -- sounding like "art" with a quiet "rt" ending.

Uh-- "ar" sounds without "r" end with "artist". I' m going to use the Burmese 1,2,3 Ton system to play these 3 sounds as..... And, yes, just a little "stress" or "tone" distinction and you have words with very different meaning. These are just a few of the ways in which the meaning of certain words can be changed with a small mismatch.

First note is like "de" in " deep". As in " de " is a good example of the second note. There is more tension in the third note, such as "dee" in "deer". In this case I have to use "e" instead of "i", because "Di" sounds like "Dianna".

Further samples for 3 notes with the vowel "E" or "I": S-1 -- sounding like "seat" without "t" end. Silicone--as in" si" of the term "seduce". Yes, it does have a little more of the Hispanic" si" - not" sy" as in" cyber". The first sonic example: a brief "u" as in "Jugend" with quiet "th"; a brief "u" in "amused".

A second audio example: The" u" has the same impartial note as in" University". The third example of sound: accentuated "u", which rings like "ew" in "New", or as New Yorkers would say "Noo" in "New York". A third example would be an accentuated "u" soundtrack in " user". Further samples for 3 notes with the vowel "U":

K3 --sounding like " Cool " with quiet " I " -- swimming. small in size. The Americans often mispronounce the last word of my last name as "pu3" in the third note, instead of the real "pu1", which I find very amusing:-)

The Mandarin to Mandarin speaking people will have no problems, as it corresponds to the fourth note in Pinyin. Phu2 -- as in "pu". The soundtrack of " pudding". Pu3--sounding like " swimming pools " without an "l" end. First note is like "Colt" without the "lt"-end note. This second note is like the first "co" of "Coca Cola".

Third example: Try to say "cold" without saying "ld" end. Because of the eccentric nature of the German word I will use "OE" or "OH" for the consonant "d" and "t" instead of the vowels "O": Tooh2 - shorts instead of long. First note is "ott" in "Scott" without the ending "tt"; it is nearer to the UK pronounciation of "o" than what an American would say, namely "Scutt".

The tone is "odd" with a quiet "d". OU1: "OU" tone in "auction". OU3: "OU" tone of the term "August". Burmese has no final words. In the same way that "s" in French is silenced in " Paris " and "Pa-ree " is uttered, Burmese has no final words that one would have expected in English.

Don't move your mouth or shut your mouth and you will speak Burmese perfectly! Further soundsamples with the vowel "Au": Peau3 -- sounding like "Paul" without "l" ring. First audio example: "The second soundtrack example: And the third example: the words "un" emphasize as in "under".

Further samples with the vowel "Un": At Lun1 -- sound like "lunt" in "blunt". Lu3 -- emphasized "Lun" in "London". It seems more likely for some words to use "An" instead of "Un": konhan1 -- sounding like British "can't" -- not US "can't". khan3 -- emphasized down to the niveau of the term "cun" in "cunning".

Hsin1 --sounding like " drop " without " k " end. "Hsin3 " has more hiss. The first example: no " tee " end. A second audio example: The third audio example: "Mai " tense as in "amazing. May1 -- "Mais" without "ze" soundtrack. may2 -- "may" as in "May I?" -- may3 -- accentuated as in "amazing".

Next note is "Self" without an "If" end. The second note is like " Salary" without an "l" end, or "pal" without "l" with "maple". Third note is like "sell" without a second " I " end. They are part of the groups "Wear", "tear", "pear".

Further samples for notes with the voice "Eare": eeare1 -- sounding like "mad" without "d" end. Signs of intent. neare3 -- accentuated like "mare" in "nightmare". This was because I couldn't use it for words that begin with the voice "a", which is like " aerial ", so I thought up this "eare " encoding to connect the words with the Myanmar group below.

The first soundtrack: "second example of sound: somewhere between "laint" and "lane" as in "flamboyant". third example of sound: fully strained "lane". à laint1 -- rolling. à laint2 -- lying. à laint3 -- applied to or rubbed on your hide or your coat.

The first soundfiles: "Not as in "won't," no. A second audio example: The third audio example: Totally stressy "Om" with quiet "m" in "Rom". Pitch1 -- Retribution as in Pitch1-pyan2. Pitch2 -- trembling, rattle, vibrate. Pitch3 -- chopping. The" "n"" makes it so... "gone". In order to romanticize this voice, I have no other option but to use the variation "m", because with "n" it becomes the number "one".

The first soundtrack: The next one is "mine" in "Minute". I' m refering to the term "mine-nute" as in "minutely small", not to the lesson and "min-it" with the same notation. Third audio example: "ýtineý sounds in "tiny", or just "mine". ýkine1 as in "kind" ýkine2 as in "kinetic" ýkine3, which is rhyming with "pine" ýkhine1 ý are part of the character called " Khine2". ýkhine2 - permanent and powerful. ýkhine3ý - order.

The first soundtrack: "Do not'' sounds in'couldn't'. A second audio example: "Kung" sounds in "Kung Fu", or "mun" in "monetary" or "monastery". The third audio example: "Toon 1 -- similar to "doont" in "couldn't". The first example: koun1 - "Count" without ending "t". The second example: konoun2 - "Counting as in "Counter Strike".

The third example: konoun3 - "Coun" as in "Counseling". until 1 - waiting. until 2 - ceiling. until 3 - harmonica. These words with individual notes are themselves categorized. These groups have English-speaking groups. Keep in mind that there are no final noises in Burmese, so try to say these words without tongues and keep your mouth apart for the last few parts of the words.

In this section, the 1,2,3-tone system in Burma is correlated with the sound classifications in some studies: Low, high, creaking sounds and & glottal stops. Glottal Stops" is regarded by some as the 4th note, while Myanmar kids are educated in only three notes at high schools: Kaa1, Kaa2, Kaa3. "The" Tone" variation in Burma and China's "Pinyin" always have the same vocal basis.

This means you cannot go Kaa1, Kaa2, Kaa3 and then KUT as the 4th note. Subtitle tun2 from the words a-thun2 means part, note or noises. While some of these vocals or noises in the Myanmar tongue can go up and down with the help of soundmarks ( (while retaining the same vowels ), some are only individual notes and cannot be combined with chime icons.

The Myanmar Commission's Myanmar International Commission's formal Myanmar languages recognize four groups of sounds or tunes as follows: thet-thun2 - First notes: -h1, e-1, u-1, ay1, a1, au-1, o1, in-1, oun-1, in-1, un-1, ain-1, ome-1, eare-1. Of these, 18 have 23 different notations, 18 of which use the toggle icon from meit, which looks like a period (.) under the sign.

There are only 13 different tones in all, as shown above by the 1,2,3-tone-system. A number of trials have shown this group to be a creaking sound. The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked tone. à tet-thun2 - Second ton : - Uh2 The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Tongong The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Tung The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Iin The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Ton The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Myanmar The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Language The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Myanmar The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Myanmar The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe alsanmar The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked System The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als System The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked System The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Thailand The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Thailand The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als My The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked System The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Thailand The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Thailand The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als My The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Second Second Second The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Second Second The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Checked Second Second Second The Myanmar Language Commission definiert diese Gruppe als Second Second..

There are only 13 different tones in all, as shown above by the 1,2,3-tone-system. A number of trials have defined this group as low ton. The Myanmar Language Commission has defined this group as the raising tonic. nain1-thun2 - Third tone: - Uh3, E3, Uh3, A-3, A-3, O-3, In-3, Oun-3, Ine-3, Un-3, Ain3, Ome-3, Eare3.

Of these, there are 18 with 21 different notations, of which 18 with a tone-change icon wit-sa1-pout, which looks like a column(:). There are only 13 different tones in all, as shown above by the 1,2,3-tone-system. A number of trials have defined this group as high clay.

The Myanmar Language Commission defined this group as Fall-ing Tine2-thun2 - Individual Tonegroups: - Ate, Et, Out, Ike, Ut, Oat, It There are 10 of those who use the concluding tut, which looks like a small "c" above the second hex. There are only 7 different tones in all, as shown above by the 1,2,3-tone-system.

The Myanmar Language Commission calls this group Ten Glottal Stops. Checking notes, raising notes, dropping notes & glottal stops in the list result in 46 notes with four missed sounds: The Burmese 1,2,3-tone system used in this website includes the lack ing vocal group "oon" (see unit 47) and the single-tone group "oot" (see unit 56).

Burmese script versions of this page contain a listing of 46 tones with romanisation and sound file MP3s. Let's test a few sentences with the sound system: beaure2 lut empty3 -- How much? beaure2 -- second note with the vowel "eare" as e.g. "mare" note in "marry-making". It has a regular naked nature in "Strawberry". Flegel -- is part of the c4 group.

It' clear enough, not unnumbered. 3 - 3. note with the vowel "Eare". Stress like "mare" in "nightmare". Simply substitute "m" by "l". barre2 thiwa3 quin2 empty3 -- Where do you want to go? barre2 -- 2. note with the vowel "eare" as "bare" in "strawberry".

thiwa3 -- third note with the vowel "A", emphasizes like Ahhhhhhhhh...., so it sounds like tha-waahhhhhh". quin2 -- second note vowel "In"; regular stresses like "sin" in "sincere". Simply substitute "s" with "ch" sounds, i.e. "chin" instead of "sin". x3 -- 3. note like "mare" in "nightmare".

Substitute "m" with "l" and say it. à sat3 yes1 zoom1 -- let's dine! à sat3 -- third note with the vowel "A"; fully accentuated as Sahhhhhhh.... yes1 -- first note with the vowel "A"; brief note like "yes" in "Japan". à zoom1 -- first note with the vowel "O"; a brief note similar to "colt" without "lt" note.

For the novice it may seem a bit bewildering at first, but the sounds become automatically and naturally with the exercise. The first time I learned Mandarin Chinese, I had initial difficulties to remember the Pinyin tonal system. In the past I used the pitch and vocalization tables, and with the repeat the notes become second nature. No. The notes are the same.

I' added the audio lookup chart in the upper lefthand corner of each lesson as a simple lookup. Hi-Fi audio material and Myanmar writing are later supplements to the initial lesson. Cheerful to learn Myanmar!!

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