Burmese Names Pronunciation

Myanmar names pronunciation

The names of the Burmese Jerry Spinelli are incredibly fascinating. Myanmar names written in Latin letters contain these extensions to indicate the fact that the extensions are written. The Burmese don't write their names like Sino styles. Burmese name, meaning, pronunciation. If you need to pronounce the names of people in Myanmar correctly, you can use this app to learn.

Myanmar Names

Burmese Names aims to help the Burmese community to better comprehend and appreciate the Burmese people's (Bamar) name. More than 235,000 names were gathered and analysed to provide a statistic view of name populity and trend. The About Burmese Names gives a brief introduction to Burmese nameing.

On Burmese Romanization some of the problems of speaking about Burmese names in the Burmese alphabet and not in the Burmese alphabet are explained. On the Burmese name information discusses the phonebook information used as a resource for names on this site, as well as some of the restrictions of this type of information.

Or, you can see detail on most of the most commonly used Burmese name elements: Alternative spellings: Explanation:Alternative notations: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings: Alternative spellings:

Translating Thai place names into Burmese - Fifty Viss

Myanmar is quite inconsistently in the transliteration of alien place names. Historic practices tend to preserve the correct use of the orginal languages. The Burmese term for France, for example, is ???????, which pronounces pyinthite in Burmese, but pronounces it sa, which is much more closely related to the French notation.

Today the predominant tendency is to copy the pronunciation of the place name in German. But when it comes to place names that use blatant Indian loan words, especially in neighbouring states like Thailand, Burmese spokesmen occasionally use similar Indian notation. First, Bangkok International Airport, named Suvarnabhumi, is presented as Thuwunnabumi (??????????) in accordance with the real Indian spelling, not with the real Thai pronunciation (Suwannaphum) nor with the anticipated German pronunciation.

Burmese spokesmen often do not recognise the Indian origin of the Thai place names they have transcribed. Instead, they produce Frankenstein transcripts that are neither orthographic nor pronounced, which in the end does a poor job on Thais and Burmese's long-standing legacy of literature and language.

Burmese and Thailand have in common, since both are offspring of the Brahmi typeface, have inherently vowelled syllables, use diacritical signs to alter sound and vocals, and more important, both have full alphabetic vaults that can transcribe both Pali and Sanskrit. What is interesting about Thailand is that although the real pronunciation can differ significantly from the initial Indian pronunciation (which makes it harder to spell Thai), it retains the initial Indian notation.

As an example, the Thailand term for "food", afhaan (?????), is actually written at ?????, the Burmese term for "food", afaya. Unnecessarily, I came across it many a time when I was studying elemental Chinese in colleges, where I recognised fundamental words that were similar to a corresponding Burmese term because the words had the same ethymological roots (although they were neighbours, Burmese and Thais did not exchange many indigenous words into each other's language - most of the common words come more from Sanskrit or Pali).

This is one of many why reading in Thai is much more difficult than in Burmese, as pronunciation often differs from notation. In contrast to Thai, a Devoweliezer diacritics (????, athat,'sound killer') was developed in Burmese writing, which represses the intrinsic vocals of a particular term and is useful to indicate whether a term has been cut off (especially important in Indian vocabulary).

The Burmese term for "look", for example, comes from Pali Rhupa (???). This is shown as root in Burmese (????), with the Devo Welizer clearly showing that the Pa in root is not expressed as a seperate chrore. However, in Thai the same term ??? is written, which can be either expressed either root or root, according to the contexts, as shown in the following table:

Thailand has a story of increasing the number of peoples and places to higher levels by accepting Indian loan, whether in the guise of kingly title or place name. As a result, Thailand is full of Sanskrit- and Pali-based place names that the Burmese should be a little known to. Indeed, most Thai counties and large towns use place names that are Sanskrit/Pali credits.

With regard to the names of places, Thais use the following Indian words when referring to places and communities (words that any Burmese with a certain acquaintance with historic narratives or even the imaginative place names in Naypyidaw would recognize): Unfortunately, it is the customary Burmese speaking practices to transcribe Thai place names using the British pronunciation and translate it as accurately as possible into Burmese pronunciation.

It is a short-sighted practise that totally removes the initial meaning of the place names that could be recognized by Burmese-speaking people. I' ve been studying almost 40 names of Thailand's cities to see if they can be transferred exactly to Burma - except for names of Thailand's tribal places that use tribal words and Khmer borrowed words.

The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ?????????Pur?ramy? Pur?ramy?: ? = Municipality The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? Pur?ramy?: ? = The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ??????pur? Pur?ramy?: = The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: = Municipality The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ?????? R?jas?m?nagara: ??s?ri The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: = The Royal The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: ? The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ?????? R?jas?m?nagara: = Sea The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ?????? R?jas?m?nagara: Municipality The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: = The Thai The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: Sr?sakesa R?jas?m?nagara: ? The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: = The Burmese The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: ? The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: Sr?sakesa R?jas?m?nagara: = Sea The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ? R?jas?m?nagara: Submakh = The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: R?jas?m?nagara R?jas?m?nagara: = The following are my suggested Burmese equivalent to Thai cities: ?????????pur? R?jas?m?nagara: Sr?sakesa.. SURENDRARA: God; ?????sura: Wasser; ?????????jala (Jalapur?)samudda: Oceans; ????????: Win; Samudrapr?k?ra: Full; ??????samudda: Blessed; (Nagarasvarga)nagara: Township; (Jayabh?mi)su: Good;

raththa i. e. a; (Vajrapur?)vajira i; diamonds; ?????vajirapaduma i; lotsus; ????????Mah?s?ragr?ma i = Schwarz; k?la???Paduma?h?n? (Mah?s?ragr?ma)Vajrapur? i = grand; K?lasindhu (Nagaraprathama)nagara i = town; (??)??? i = visithu; (Suvarnapuri)v?su i = gol;; The following are examples: (Uttarat?rtha)uttara= north; Samudrasangr?ma= win; ??????s?ha= ascent; Samudrasangr?ma= town; (Simhapuri)Samuddasa?g?ma= Leo; uttaraJayan?da??????s?ha (Samudrasangr?ma)samudda- Ozean; The listing is certainly not exhaustive and perhaps some Etymologien are inexact.

Might be further indigenised in Beitthanolawka (????????????), since the Burmese term for Vishnu is actually Beikthano (???????), a loan from Sanskrit Vi??u (??????), not from Pali V?su (????). It is an ancient town also known as S?keta (?????). Thaukkate is more commonly used in Burma for Sukhothai, although Thaukkate (??????) is more well known.

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