Burma Rock Formation

Burmese Rock Formation

Burma's lakefront rock formation above, which is a praying mother and son, is not a natural rock formation found in Burma. Prayer Mother and Son Rock Formation An e-mail says that an attachment is a rock formation in Burma similar to a mom and kid worshipping at a sea. This picture is not a photo of a true rock formation. It' actually an artwork in a Korea children's textbook. This is a form of rochingosa around the lagoon in Burmania.

The astonishing picture shows an e-mail in Portuguese. It is claimed by the Embassy that the picture is a rock formation on a shore in Burma. In accordance with the messages, the picture represents a prayerful parent and a prayerful child and can best be seen by tipping the face to the south. It is a rock formation on the shore of a Burmese pond.

This picture can only be viewed at a certain season, as the solar ray is reflected. For better vision, tip your mind to the right as if you were looking at the picture from an 90 degree right turn and look at the mirror images in the sea that are connected to the rock formation.

An additional release will circulate via e-mail with an attachment to the Microsoft PowerPoint slideshow, which contains the following English description: The image shows a rock on a Burmese ocean, which can only be seen once a year with a particular position of the earth's rays and lighting in it.

Lean your neck to the right to see how amazing it is. PowerPoint displays images in either portrait or landscape view and prompts the receiver to "send this e-mail to at least 10 people". This picture has caused much discussion and conjecture, and many believe that it is a true rock formation.

No wonder that the painting is indeed a work of artwork and does not represent a real scenery. This painting is a children's illustrated textbook by the famous Kim Jae-hong. You can see the photo and other similar artwork in the sequences in photos from the children's books on a blog posting in KORE.

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