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Burma Forest information and dates. At all times you can be sure that you are reading unbiased, factual and accurate information. Provider of disaster information in Burma. In order for Burma to make the transition to an inclusive information society, it faces many challenges. The Myanmar Institute of Information Technology-Burma (Myanmar)-Mandalay.

Providing information in the Burmese area and Burma

Descriptive/Topic:Monitors web filter..... "The OpenNet initiative is a collaboration of four major academia: the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto; the Berkman Center for International Studies at Harvard University; the Advanced Network Research Group at Cambridge Security Programme, University of Cambridge; and the Oxford University.

It is our goal to examine, detect and analyse the filter and monitoring methods on the web in a trustworthy and impartial manner. Our objective is to identify the possible traps and accidental effects of these practice and thus help to improve the quality of our communication and communication policies in this area. Develop and deploy a range of technological bulletins and key methods to explore web filtration and monitoring; 2) Build capacity in the network of community lawyers and research; 3.

Hatred Speeches, Liars and Misinformed Medias - How a malicious mediasampaign has increased the pressures on a contested population. Synopsis/Topic: "n The Listening Post this week: Behind the Rohingya crises, a malicious press action has constantly increased the pressures on a fiercely contested population. Plus, the darkened Sinai press in Egypt.

Hassreden, lie and Medienfehlinformationen the number of the Muslim Rohingya expelled by the majority from their houses in Myanmar is meanwhile with approximately 400,000. This de facto guide to the state - former Nobel Peace Prize laureate and favourite of the world' s leading newsmedia - is seen in a completely new perspective.

Mr Aung San Suu Kyi and her administration are on the defence. Descriptive/Topic:Status: "Increased web penetration rate and digitally-enhanced support enhanced the liberty of the web, although 2011 also saw the highest number of law enforcement actions since liberalisation began. Myanmar went through its second stage of transformation and in April 2016 moved from the military-backed administration to the National League for Democracy (NLD) under the chairmanship of Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi.

It was worrying that web surfers were hesitant in their discussions about the new administration and remained self-censored after the November election because they feared bullying and bullying by the still mighty army and even adherents of the democratic-electors. Unparalleled momentum in the November 2015 parliamentary election was hampered by the bullying of web surfers by followers on both sides of the ailment.

Former army commander Thein Sein's administration formally ended the 2012 press-censury. The Norwegian Telenor Group has set up the country's first ever autonomous link to the world wide web, and Qatars Ooredoo introduced cellular services in large parts of the state in 2014. A Telecommunications Act has been adopted by the Chinese authorities to ease this opening of the markets.

According to a recent survey, all large German politicians were involved in the use of online advertising in the big city, and the use of the web was 12% higher than normal across Germany on polling days. Religions of the nationalistic movement have had a negative impact on online debates, especially in the run-up to the electoral process and immediately after the new administration took over.

Descriptive/Topic:"....Internet literacy in Myanmar has decreased in the reporting year compared to the advances made since liberalisation in 2011. Governments and insurgents have intensified harassment of web surfers in the face of protest, aggravated conflicts in ethnical minorities and preparations for the 2015 election...."

Descriptive/Topic: "The Emergency Voice of Burma, or DVB, began sending messages and information to Myanmar by wireless and short wave in 1992 when expatriates in Norway began sending messages and information to Myanmar. Headquartered in Chiang Mai, Thailand, DVB talked to U Khin Maung Soe, Myanmar Times Sr. Nyan Lynn Aung about why the press is one of the most popular areas of reforms - and why it is still so far...".

Descriptive/Topic: "Reporters looking for information in the departments know that the job is associated with "ifs". As part of the changes made by President U Thein Sein to enhance visibility and enhance the relationship with the masses, all Nay Pyi Taw departments have officials, but few, if any, actually talk to the news. U Ye Htut, Deputy Minister of Information, says that efforts to motivate these speakers to deal with the news have largely foundered because the news is still cautious and there is no entry into high-level forums.

" Sources/Publishing House: "Myanmar Times" Description/Topic: "A year after the Myanmar Free Media Disability Act was formally quashed by the Myanmar authorities, a draft bill in parliament could allow the resurgence of earlier forms of repression. As the Union Solidarity and Development of Thein Sein regime ended the last law of censure in August last year, many welcomed a new period of freedom of speech and an end to the pressure exerted on reporters over the last half-century.

Nevertheless, many reporters are worried about the state of affairs regarding the state of press reforms in the state. At present, a law on publishers that gives the Ministry of Information (MOI) excessive authority to grant and withdraw permission to publish has been adopted by the lower chamber and is to be examined by the lower house...."

Sources/Publishing House: Asia Times Online Description/Topic: "In January 2013, the Myanmar authorities announces liberalization projects in the country's telecom industry and announces two national telecom-licences. A number of different types of service can be offered by effective tenderers, among them mobiles and webs. Burma's goverment has pledged to significantly lower the costs of cell phone use and has ambitiously targeted 50 per cent cell phone coverage by 2016, a significant improvement over the present 5-10 per cent coverage rate.

For a long time now, Humans Watch has been convinced that the web and wireless services have huge appeal for people. The development of Burma's information and telecommunication sector (ICT) could stimulate the economy and citizen involvement in a nation that has been shut down for many years. E-mail, messaging, social networking and cellular telephones have become indispensable for reporters, HR professionals and communities around the world because these key enabling the immediate delivery of information, accessibility and local effectiveness.

Nevertheless, Burma's democracy reform remains fragmentary and the Burmese authorities and their secret services are continuing to violate serious international humanitarian law. Businesses arriving in Burma run the danger of abusing the country, particularly in areas such as telecoms and the web, which have been associated with previous abuse and where rights-based reform has so far been under-performing.

The opening of these industries to foreign investments carries the danger that the goverment will try to include technological enterprises in illicit monitoring, censure and other mistreatment. HRW has described several necessary measures to support appropriate protection of privacy for Burmese wireless and wireless communications in Burma and the necessary measures to encourage good governance investments in Burma's telecom and wireless sector.

Telecommunication and ICT businesses should not move forward in Burma until such action is taken, given the challenges to man. In order to ensure that the Burmese people's prerogatives are respected, global telecom and ICT firms should take sensible action from the start to evaluate the effects on humans and tackle any damage that may arise from their activities.

You should carry out a so-called "human right due diligence" and take strict security measures to avoid and combat abuse, also with regard to the right to free speech, information and private life....". Titel:Myanmar Press Reform: Descriptive/Topic: "The proclamation was celebrated worldwide as another symbol of the reform:

Within the audio-visual world, where businesses and reporters have championed the right to produce publications every day rather than every week, the message has been welcomed with a mix of easement and anxiety, as the realities of assembling, publishing and disseminating a paper every 24 hours..." Sources/Publishing House: "Myanmar Times" Description/Topic: "I am optimistic that I speak on account of all those who work in the Myanmar public service - and perhaps most who work for state papers - when I say that until August this year the censor was the bane of our work.

It was the censor who caused outbreaks in the newsroom, which clearly demonstrated to many of my Myanmar counterparts that I am an uncivilized savage; it is the alleged cause why my beloved colleague, Sonny Swe, the former Myanmar Times Assistant CEO, one of the few civil casualties of the 2004 military intelligence cleanup, was imprisoned for 14 years the following year.

" Sources/Publishing House: "Myanmar Times" Description/Topic: "If you want a fast overview of the changes in Myanmar, this is a good first. Quotations from two members of the state. Complete liberty of the press in Myanmar? "Sources/Editor: Asia Times Online Description/Topic: March 29, 2012 Presentation at the Conference on Medial Development in Myanmar, organized by the Ministry of Information and UNESCO Yangon, Myanmar, March 19-20, 2012.... CONCLUSION:"...At the beginning I stressed that the rule of law is the core concern of the administration and noted the crucial role that the three-tier system of legislation, regulation and legal safeguards must play.

Those who defend and defend the right to free speech, the right of association, the right to information and the right to be heard and the right of the judiciary are particularly sensitive. Rugged regulatory framework conditions for free speech, information and communication are crucial and irreversible people. It is also strong societal goods, as it enables the regime to perform its tripartite function, retain its responsibility to the rule of law and preserve best practice in good management.

Openness through information, control through the free media and criticism through free speech provide the conditions in which a good governance can thrive and develop. To put it another way, if the right is the frame on which the power and permanence of a community stand and fall, then the right to free speech, information and media is also the right of a government's own coaches!

It is a daunting task, a purpose, an incentive and a motivator: without them, no single administration can work at the highest level or attain the best for those who give their raisons d'être to governments: the population. "Descriptive/Topic:"....Earlier this months the US authorities released several overseas newscast sites, among them Reuters, The Guardian, CNN and the Bangkok Post.

Several of the new pages - Voice of America, Radio Free Asia and the BBC - have Burma bilingual content. Web pages of Burma's exile intelligence organizations such as the Burma and Irrawaddy are now available, as are online media services such as hotmail, blogger and YouTube.

It is not only that a large number of sites are still taboo, the use of the web is still limited to the country's open cybercafés, too. In November 2010, Rangoon's Yangon web surfers were asked by the Rangoon authorities to deploy camera, monitor and keyboard input tools to record and trace on-line use.

Descriptive/Topic: "Myanmar's new administration has ceased to block some foreign web pages, such as the BBC and YouTube, in a proclamation of frankness mitigated by continued strict legislation that still puts the reader of such web pages at grave peril. as well as the Cambodian Voice of Burma, Radio Free Asia and the videofilesharing site YouTube.

At the beginning of the year, the country's long-standing army rule passed control to a nominal civil regime...." Descriptive/Topic:CONCLUSION: "The results of the 2011 surveillance (which was carried out after the nomination of a new civil administration with the objective of assessing whether there was a shift in public policies, showed the opposite and confirm the former tendencies and pattern seen during the preceding surveillance period.

This suggests that the supervised state-controlled mass media in Burma do not adhere to journalism norms, but merely act as a voice for the dominant states. More than six months after the 2010 failed general election, which was denounced by the United Nations and the entire global public, the major television stations' major newscasts once again showed only the best civil servants and ignored all other parties...".

Descriptive/Topic:CONCLUSION: "The results of the 2011 surveillance (which was carried out after the nomination of a new civil administration with the objective of assessing whether there was a shift in public policies, showed the opposite and confirm the earlier tendencies and pattern seen during the preceding surveillance period. This suggests that the supervised state-controlled mass media in Burma do not adhere to journalism norms, but merely act as a voice for the dominant states.

More than six-month after the 2010 failed general government polls, which the United Nations and the entire global public opinion was condemning, the major television stations' major newscasts once again showed only the best civil servants and ignored all other parties...". Descriptive/Topic: "Freedom of the press and on-line information are still being disregarded in Burma, three month after Thein Sein was elected civil president.

However, severe prison terms for reporters, the abandonment of papers and policing in cybercafés show that checks and intimidations have not abated. Now a number of new policies have increased scrutiny of the use of the Internet....."........ Three months after Thein Sein was elected head of Burma, press freedom and freedom of information on the web are still being violated.

File format/Size:pdf (399K); html, Description/Topic:Introduction: "Burma's army youngsters are interested in developing and using information and communications technology (ICT) for commercial and propagandistic ends, while making aggressively efforts to restrict public participation in the web and electronic communications, monitor contents and penalize people for any on-line activities that are considered harmful to the regime's wellbeing.

Governments use a broad variety of means to limit the freedoms of the web, which includes legislative and regulative obstacles, infrastructure and technological restrictions and enforcement actions such as harassment and long jail time. Over the past three years, ICT penetration has gradually improved, but the regime has also been aggressive towards those who engage in anti-governmental activity or who are in touch with overseas newscasts.

With the suppression of Buddhist monk lead protest in September 2007, the army has imposed stricter license requirements that oblige the owner of cyber cafes, where most of Burma's visitors gain entry, to watch users' monitors and collaborate with criminals. Enforcement of both on-line and off-line surveillance and information checks in connection with the 7 November 2010 referendum, which brought the military-backed faction a far-reaching win and were found to be erroneous.

Incorporating the first privately owned ISP, Bagan Cybertech, in 2002 contributed to increasing the number of people using the site, even though the business was later taken over by the JD. Up to 2010, there were over 520 recorded Burmese cafes, mainly in some large towns. Myanmar Computer Science Development Law of 1996, which punishes the ownership of an unauthorised computer modems and the connections to unauthorised computer nets with up to 15 years imprisonment, was the government's first attempts to limit the liberty of the Internets.

Since then, other legislation and policies have encouraged the government's attempts to combat unregulated use of the Web. "Descriptive/Topic: "Burma took dramatic steps in 2010 to reorganize the country's web and equip itself with the means to disrupt its people's web connection at the next signs of a globalized world.

Before the November 2010 election - the first in twenty years - the sensors used raids, intimidations and cyber attacks to mitigate the risks of cybershooting. Manipulation is now at its peak....."....Widespread network corruption in Burma...Outstanding bloggers...Three news items are still pining in prison...Reconfiguring the Myanmar web behind a smoke screen...Unreliable web connectivity in advance until November 7, 2010:

Describe/Topic:Conclusion: "Earlier observation of the pre-election era found that the state-controlled Burmese press was the voice of the dominant forces and did not adhere to journalism as such. Covering the two week eDay reporting horizon, this survey showed that the general trend in government reporting noted in the preceding surveys remains the same.

Whereas in state-owned outlet stores press reporting concentrated on the choice, reporting was tight and there was a shortage of analytic or discernment. A clear prejudice in favour of state officers and incumbent holders, coupled with a total absence of criticism of the government agencies and a failure to report on the opposition's opinions, characterised Burma's newsmedia.

Reporting on the NLD leader's liberation in the state press was highly confined and unimportant compared to the scope of the authorities' accounts. Exiled members of the NLD provided a multifaceted view of the various policy players and paid great heed to the NLD leaders after they were freed from their home detention; the NLD was a dominating policy issue in the exiled world.

To this end, the polls were overwhelmed by the NLD leader's abrupt appearance in Burma's politics and NLD while they boycotted polls, dominating the reporting of the post-election exiled media" abstract / topic: Conclusion: "Earlier observation that reflected the pre-election era found that the state-controlled mass media in Burma were the voice of the dominant forces and did not adhere to the highest standard of journalism.

Covering the two week follow-up to E-Day, this survey showed that the general trend in government reporting noted in the preceding surveys remains the same. Whereas in state-owned outlet stores press reporting concentrated on the choice, reporting was tight and there was a lack of analytic or discerning opinions about the processes.

A clear prejudice in favour of state officers and incumbent holders, coupled with a total absence of criticism of the government agencies and a failure to report on the opposition's opinions, characterised Burma's newsmedia. Reporting on the NLD leader's liberation in the state press was highly confined and unimportant compared to the scope of the authorities' accounts.

Exiled members of the NLD provided a multifaceted view of the various policy players and paid great heed to the NLD leaders after they were freed from their home detention; the NLD was a dominating policy issue in the exiled world. To this end, the polls were overwhelmed by the NLD leader's abrupt appearance in Burma's politics and NLD while they boycotted polls, dominating exiled press reporting after the polls" abstract / topic: "Top developments:

  • Aung San Suu Kyi released, but the regime is still arresting reporters, reviewers..... "Burma entered an unpredictable new epoch in November, after almost five consecutive years of military domination, when it held nationwide election and liberated pro-democracy leaders Aung San Suu Kyi. Although ruled by the elected nominees of the army junta, it was the first civil administration in the state since 1962.

In the elections, army commanders who are infamous for their lack of independence internationally searched for them. "They were formulated in such a way that the army would remain in power, no matter how the vote was taken, but nevertheless the government could not stand up to being intimidated on polling day and filling the wills. Descriptive/Topic: "Despite very low connection activity, Burmese web surfers have been able to provide invaluable information to the outside community during high-politics.

Burma's junta has continued to impose strict general entry controls, the most radical of which occured during the total closure of the Burma web in September and October 2007. In addition to these accessibility obstacles, the state also controls web contents through one of the strictest information monitoring systems in the world...."

Describe/Topic:Conclusion: "Threemonth surveillance has shown that the supervised, state-controlled Burmese mass media are not following journalism professionals' norms, but are merely a voice for the dominant forces. Throughout the three monthly observation periods, no reflections of conflicting or discriminatory opinions were seen in state-controlled publications.

During the pre-election era, the major television stations' major newscasts showed only the top state officers and ignored all other interest groups outright. There was an extremely restricted variety of policy players, with practically no other policy issues having direct contact with the country's major information resources.

It' s also worrying that these worrying tendencies in the way the state-controlled press reports on policy units are not due to short-term abnormalities, but to real tendencies in the Myanmar press. To a certain degree, these adverse tendencies are reinforced by the exiled masses, which provide a wide spectrum of opinions, with the most significant reporting coming from the most important opponent Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy against her.

Nonetheless, the exiled media's potentially geographic reach and thus its availability to the people of Burma is much smaller than that of the state-controlled Burma mass media. exiled people in Burma have no direct contact with the state. Overall, candidates were granted very limited admission to the press and were hindered from fully exercising their right to free speech.

Burma's total absence of impartial and impartial coverage by the Burma press restricted voters' exposure to a wide variety of information that would allow them to make an educated vote in the polls. Describe/Topic:Conclusion: "Yatanarpon Myanmar National Web Portal is anticipated to deliver accelerated bandwith and enhanced Web service to Myanmar's Websurfers.

As things stand today, however, only ministry customers, in particular the Ministry of Defence, will benefit from a quicker web connectivity and thus better webervices. But with Burma's low per head incomes, only a small proportion of the population will benefit from FTTH.

Separate character of the new system would also allow the public administrations to switch off the civil service without affecting the other two service providers serving the administration and the army. It is likely that the public services will take this occasion to suppress the free movement of the media and opinion. This new system also gives the army sole command of the Hantharwaddy National Gateway.

It is now able to snoop on all Burma's people - civil, soldier and administration people. "Descriptive/Topic:Top Developments: - State censored all printed media, monitors stations..... "All year long, Burma's governing regime stressed its intention to move towards multi-party democratic leadership after centuries of armed struggle, a long awaited move that dissenters and others saw as a deception to further strengthen the force of the army.

When preparing for the 2010 parliamentary election - the first since the annulment of the 1990 election by the army, won by an overwhelming majority by the ruling party oppositions - the government kept a strong censor on the regional press and detained at least nine reporters behind bars...". Descriptive/Topic: "Burma's already besieged press were heavily attacked after the mass cyclone Nargis destroyed the south coast of the nation in May, killed an estimated 84,500 and hit another two.

In the aftermath of a sluggish and insufficient reaction to the catastrophe, both locally and internationally, the army jungle stepped up its efforts to censor and repress messages illustrating the exceptional extent of the storm's wreck. In a letter from the Ministry of Information's Press Control and Registration Department (PSRD), an instruction was sent to the editors on how the human rights crises could be addressed, prohibiting the release of photos showing corpses and critiques of the government's reflex.

A minimum of five Mexican reporters were arrested for reporting cyclones, which the CPJ research found to be in violation of the stringent regulations. Descriptive/Topic: "Intimidation, detentions and dramatic jail terms peaked again in Burma last year..... Burma's JOURNALIST face an Orwellian investigation and were imprisoned and intimidated throughout 2008, while also attacking Myanmara' in exile via their computers...."

Synopsis/Topic:A Myanmar based female editor working for The Associated Press has won the 2008 Journalism and Courage Award from the International Women's.... "Aye Aye Win, a Burma-based writer, has been working as a Burma based newspaper for almost 20 years - a "risky business," she said in a text. Descriptive/Topic: "BURMA's ruler and political opponents have little previous exposure to free and sovereign mass media. l The BURMA government and political oppo nition have little previous experience with free and independent media.

This is definitely a matter of interest when you think about a prospective Burma democracy...." Descriptive/Topic: "Burma's law scholars use old tricks and new technologies to remain faithful to their words and escape the junta's attempts to censure them? Burma's Press Scrutiny and Registration Division is still facing new stakes in its tireless effort to rehabilitate the country's printed press.

Myanmar has a well-deserved image as "an adversary of the press", but Myanmar authors say they are fearless of the government's attempts to silence freedom of speech. Descriptive/Topic:"...When friars took to the street in September, our journalist - who also owns the magazine - let us report on the incidents, but we could never tell about them.

It struck me that many Myanmar journalists made contact with various groups in Burma's foreign and exil press. So when we asked the journalist to set one up so we could see the reporting on the demonstration, he unexpectedly complied. Descriptive/Topic: "Burma's exiles were the focus of attention during the September riot. When Burma's population is prepared to make changes, we must ask ourselves whether the exiles of Burma's leading newspapers are prepared to do so.

Myanmar was perhaps the most vibrant free newspaper in Southeast Asia in the 1950' and 60'. Burma's first 1947 constitutional charter granted people the right to voice their views and beliefs. Unfortunately, Burma's freedom of opinion and freedom of the mass media was short-lived. Soon after the 1962 putsch, the first attack on journalists took place.

After that, media freedoms began to crumble, cut off from Gen Ne Win's Nazi regimes. Throughout the 1980', all expressions of opinion and publication had to go through Burma's infamous censorship committee, now known as the Pressure Scrutiny and Registration Division, although Burma's second constitutional treaty, drafted in 1974, ensured free speech....".

Descriptive/Topic: "Burma's general may have misjudged the might of the Net during the 2007 insurgency, but they are now engaged in the process of catching up.... Burma's army rulers have found a new foe - the increasing number of "cyber-dissidents" who are becoming popular both inside and outside the state. Synopsis/Topic:Burmese reporters were heavily attacked in August and September when they reported pro-democracy road protest and the retaliation of the army rulers, which meant a significant worsening in one of the most oppressive mass communication settings in the game.

They forbade reporting of the insurrection and tried to isolated the people by hindering the Internet and telephone services. Descriptive/Topic:84 min runtime. part 1-9, click on age left, below, or in right handed columns of youth page.... "Armed with small mobile cams video journalists in Burma keep up the stream of messages from their own land, even though they risk death and death in prison".

Your footage will be contraband from Burma and returned by air. Since the Secret Service understand the powers of the cameras, the VIPs become their main targets. "Synopsis/Topic:Executive Summary: "This issue explores the roles of information technologies, citizens' writers and blogs in Burma and presents a technological review of the Burma government's sudden disconnection of the Islamic connection on September 29, 2007, after using force against demonstrators there.

The complete truncation of internatinal web sites is seldom. Nepal, which cut off all of the world's high-speed lines when the King of Nepal proclaimed the rule of war in February 2005, is the only other state to take such dramatic precaution. The steps taken by the Burma administration to restrict the use of the Web during this economic downturn are in line with earlier results of the OpenNet Initiative (ONI) in Kyrgyzstan, Belarus and Tajikistan, where governments monitored the use of communications technology to restrict societal mobilisation during major policy outbreaks.

But what sets the Myanmar militia apart is its obvious objective of ensuring that information does not reach a broader global public. Disconnection of web access was triggered by the use of photos, patches and video footage documenting the forcible repression of protest in Burma, which helped in a wide-spread global conviction of the Burma army government's grave violation of humanitarian law.

We investigate the implications of communications technologies in the design of these important policy incidents in Burma, the limits of these instruments and the outlook for the next round of information-warfare. OpenNet Initiative Bulletin Description/Topic: Myanmar's dictatorial army jungle is gradually extending web connectivity while retaining one of the world's most stringent security controls.

In spite of the fact that less than 1 per cent of Myanmar's population has wireless broadband connections, the Chinese authorities have relied on the same dedication with which they have suppressed conventional means and votes for reforms in order to promote independence in on-line publishing and dissension. Descriptive/Topic: "Military-led Burma, also known as Myanmar, remains one of the most oppressive places for reporters to persecute only North Korea on the CPJ-10 most censors.

Calling itself the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), the regime exercised Orwell' oversight over all forms of communication and harassed or detained reporters who deviated from the formal line or assisted international correspondent in critically covering. The two reporters were arrested for trying to shoot outside the country's disputed new capitol, Pyinmana, after the general leaders unawares to relocate Rangoon's state.

Burma's government kept at least seven reporters behind bars, making it the fifth largest journalist prison in the world...." Descriptive title: "Report of the Committee for the Protection of Journalists" ......... Burmese army chiefs are coercing their citizens to living behind a brick-bust of oppressive ignoring and have shown no sign of liberalising one of the toughest governments in the game.

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